CASE STUDY: EDUCATIONAL

Dr Esmita Charani of Imperial College Hospital has been researching the important global issue of antibiotic resistance.
Summarise the major findings of interview-based PhD research about the need for global antibiotic management. The interviews in question were conducted across multiple countries and hospitals, addressing the problems faced by healthcare professionals in dealing with antibiotic resistance.
We went into the Imperial offices to personally meet with the researcher and the team in order to gain a full understanding of the research and its purpose.
This stage was quite challenging as we had to distil an entire PhD thesis (including 17,000 words of interview transcripts) into key findings and then demonstrate findings with the most relevant examples from the interviews.
We took what we learnt in the previous two stages and wrote a script which begins by identifying the topic and the problem, then depicts the most insightful interview responses, and ends by summarising the findings. Alongside the script we sketched out a storyboard. At this stage it is crucial to find imagery that will complement the script in the right way to maximise engagement and understanding.
Storyboard
Artwork
We created a few different bespoke styles which we felt were most appropriate for their genre and presented them to Imperial. Then with feedback from their team we arrived at a clean and bright vector-based style, which we all felt best suited the medical theme of the research.
As this specific animation required several voices from around the world, we drew on our network of talented VO actors, as well as recording the main Imperial researcher herself presenting the key findings.
Voiceover & Narration
Wireframe
The wireframe uses the approved artwork and style, with basic movements timed to the voiceover. This stage allows us to begin to envisage what the final animation will look like and allows for constructive appraisals from everyone involved before investing time into the more complex movements/animation.
Once all the above is in place, we create a first draft and subsequent drafts until the final version is ready. At this stage we also source music and sound effects to ground the visuals and bring the whole animation to life.
Drafts & Final Delivery
Throughout the entire process we sent regular updates and were always available for communication with the Imperial team, to ensure that they remained in control of their animation every step of the way… but we dealt with the faff!
Summarise the major findings of interview-based PhD research about the need for global antibiotic management. The interviews in question were conducted across multiple countries and hospitals, addressing the problems faced by healthcare professionals in dealing with antibiotic resistance.
We went into the Imperial offices to personally meet with the researcher and the team in order to gain a full understanding of the research and its purpose.
This stage was quite challenging as we had to distil an entire PhD thesis (including 17,000 words of interview transcripts) into key findings and then demonstrate findings with the most relevant examples from the interviews.
We took what we learnt in the previous two stages and wrote a script which begins by identifying the topic and the problem, then depicts the most insightful interview responses, and ends by summarising the findings. Alongside the script we sketched out a storyboard. At this stage it is crucial to find imagery that will complement the script in the right way to maximise engagement and understanding.
We created a few different bespoke styles which we felt were most appropriate for their genre and presented them to Imperial. Then with feedback from their team we arrived at a clean and bright vector-based style, which we all felt best suited the medical theme of the research.
As this specific animation required several voices from around the world, we drew on our network of talented VO actors, as well as recording the main Imperial researcher herself presenting the key findings.
The wireframe uses the approved artwork and style, with basic movements timed to the voiceover. This stage allows us to begin to envisage what the final animation will look like and allows for constructive appraisals from everyone involved before investing time into the more complex movements/animation.
Once all the above is in place, we create a first draft and subsequent drafts until the final version is ready. At this stage we also source music and sound effects to ground the visuals and bring the whole animation to life.
Throughout the entire process we sent regular updates and were always available for communication with the Imperial team, to ensure that they remained in control of their animation every step of the way… but we dealt with the faff!